Wednesday, February 11, 2015

Stormy Weather & Winter Writing

If you have picked up a newspaper or listened to a newscast within the last month, you have certainly heard enough about winter storms!  Why not take advantage of the cold, snow or rain outside and curl up with your journal inside? 

Here is a great technique for doing some in-depth winter writing. 

DIG DEEPLY

Winter can make you feel like hibernating.  Take advantage of the season and go deeply into an area you have been ignoring or avoiding.  Perhaps it is a relationship you have been struggling with, a decision you are having trouble with or a project you have been procrastinating.  Whatever the issue, commit to writing about it for seven days in a row.  That’s right.  Take a week and in as little as ten minutes a day (of course you can write more if you want to!), write about this subject.  

Go ahead and complain, whine and dump.  Get it out of your system.  Continue writing for seven days, even if it feels like you aren’t going anyway.  Continue to get it all out.

INTERVIEW YOURSELF

Now pretend you are an interviewer and set up a dialogue with yourself.  Ask yourself questions like:
  • What is this all about?
  • What is really going on here?
  • Why have I been avoiding this issue?
During your “interview,” answer the questions honestly.  Write quickly without editing.  Allow feelings to come up.  Don’t think about it.  Just write.

LET IT REST

After you are done with the dialogue between you and your “interviewer,” let the writing sit for a day or two.  When you go back to it, you may have a new perspective, insight or direction.

In the next few days, find another topic and start the process again.  Pick something that’s bothering you, feels unfinished or needs to be taken care of.  

It may be cold, rainy or snowy outside, but your winter writing can generate plenty of heat!

Take good care,

 



P.S. Remember, if you haven’t done so before, take advantage of our Complimentary Coaching Consultation and we'll talk about what you need to get more deeply connected to your writing. Phone (800) 552-WRITE, that's (800) 552-9748 or write to me at susan@susanborkin.com to find out more.

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Copyright © 2015 Susan Borkin

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Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Looking Backward, Aiming Forward

Happy New Year!  This month rather than resolutions, I want to discuss setting goals. What’s the difference? Generally, when we make New Year’s resolutions, it’s more of a wish list. I am resolving to do something, but I have no specific plan to do so. To give your goals more “oomph” here are some ideas.

LOOKING BACKWARD

It’s easy to be hard on yourself when you look back at last year and think about what you didn’t accomplish.  Try this instead.  On a piece of paper write down everything you did accomplish, no matter how small you judge the accomplishment to be. Did you clean out a closet or get caught up on your filing?  Did you try any new recipes or finally start writing in your new journal? Was this the year you actually used your gym membership? Try this method of giving yourself credit for what you have done before you start with new goals. 

THE WHEEL OF LIFE

Here’s a way to organize your list of goals. Start by drawing a circle in the middle of a piece of paper.  Now, divide the circle into eight different sections, just like you would if you were cutting up a pie.  Label the sections with titles such as friends & family, finances, work and career, health, personal and spiritual growth, partner or romance, and physical environment. These are only suggestions; create section titles that work best for you. 
Taking one area at a time, write down what you really want to accomplish in this area of your life.  What is it that you really want to happen?  Be as specific as possible.

THE GOOD…

With each goal you have written, write down how you will feel when you accomplish it.  Take your time, close your eyes and really see what your life will be like when you accomplish this goal. If you would like, create a collage or symbol to represent this goal.

THE BAD…

This part isn’t as much fun, but it is equally as important to do.  Again, taking your time and closing your eyes, imagine how you will feel if you don’t accomplish these goals.  Take them one at a time, and without dwelling on it for too long, get a sense of what it will be like if you don’t accomplish these goals.  Write down what you see.  

THE CHALLENGE

Based on what you’ve written, select one or two goals to begin. Don’t worry about the goals that you haven’t selected at this time. Everything you really want to get done will get done; but you can’t do everything at once. The challenge here is prioritize what is most important to start. Perhaps you have had this experience in the past---doing too many things at once only results in getting nothing done. 

STEP-BY-STEP

Finally, for the one or two goals you will be working with, make a list of action steps you will need to complete to accomplish this goal. One way of doing this is to begin with the end result you are trying to accomplish. Work backwards, and then reverse your list of steps. Pick up your paper or electronic planner and note deadlines for these steps. Remember that breaking each step down into tiny action steps will move the process along. 

OBSTACLES AND SUPPORT 

You may also choose to write down any obstacles you can anticipate or might run into along the way. Anticipating obstacles will help keep you focused and on top of your action steps. Don’t forget to also note what you will be doing to make sure you have accountability and support.

Good luck and let me know if I can help!

Happy New Year,


 



P.S. Remember, if you haven’t done so before, take advantage of our Complimentary Coaching Consultation and we'll talk about what you need to get those goals accomplished. Phone (800) 552-WRITE, that's (800) 552-9748 or write to me at susan@susanborkin.com to find out more.

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Copyright © 2015 Susan Borkin

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Monday, December 1, 2014

'Twas The Night Before Writing

'Twas the week before deadline and all through the house,
An author was disgruntled and could only grouse.
Words were not flowing from her fingertips,
And after awhile, angry words flew from her lips.

“What was I thinking when I thought I wanted to write?
Each word that I scribble is so boring and trite.”
Where is the inspiration I dreamed I would hear?
My Muse is in hiding: she’s nowhere near!

“What to do? What to do?” she cried out.
With no one else home, the walls echoed her shout.
Perhaps there was an answer, some magic pill,
Or a wand to wave to conjure words at her will.

Alas and alack, no right words could she find!
She knew soon that she would lose her mind
And if she continued her angst with such worry and fret,
Her writing goals would never be met!

But then she remembered what she already knew––
The only way to the end was to work it through.
Like a whisper she heard “Put your butt in the chair,
And not only that, you must keep it there!”

“For the designated time you promised for today,
Put your fingers on the keyboard; it’s the only way.
There is no magic here; it is just doing the work.”
(Did she just hear her Muse chortle and smirk?)

So she set the timer on her desk clock,
And then, her phone ringer she set to block.
Any distraction or malingering tasks
Were now banned---need you ask…

What happened next to this sad author’s plight?
Oh how she hated when her Muse was so right!
Butt in the chair, fingers to the keys, clock set,
It all seemed perfect to produce and yet…

Something still was missing from this situation,
For she needed to pull words from her imagination.
She ruminated, thought, and these wild thoughts ran.
But nothing really happened until she began.

For all of her studying and planning and care,
She had forgotten the most important ingredient there,
She was no dummy; she might be considered smart,
But rule number one––she did have to start!

Take good care,

 


If you find yourself in a funk, contact me for an informative discovery session via phone or in person. Phone (800) 552-WRITE, that's (800) 552-9748 or write to me at susan@susanborkin.com to find out more. 

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Copyright © 2014 Susan Borkin

Thursday, October 9, 2014

Writing In Your Sleep & Creative Napping

Having occasional bouts of insomnia, I have found the art of napping to be a true blessing.  In this article we’ll explore how to use naps and a good night’s sleep as a writing and creativity enhancer.

ASK A GOOD QUESTION BEFORE YOU NOD OFF 

Just before you close your eyes before bed or a nap, ask a question about a current project.  You might ask “What’s bothering me about the character in chapter 4 of my novel?”  Or, “Where am I stuck with the copy for my website?”  You might be wondering,  “What would be the best market for the article I want to write about my recent trip?”  

You need not limit yourself to asking questions about your writing or creative life.  You may have relationship or career choice questions.  You may have questions about your spiritual life or larger questions about your life purpose. This technique will work in any area of your life.  

Your brain is like a search engine, just waiting to begin scanning for an answer to your question.

Try to let go and trust that whatever information you do get is meant to be helpful or guide you in some way. 

PAY ATTENTION TO THE LANGUAGE OF YOUR DREAMS

Once you ask the question, know that the creative process is already underway.  But because it is a creative process, you don’t necessarily know the format in which your answer will come.  

Information may come in the form of a dream.  You may see yourself on a stage performing, with the words you were searching for coming in the lyrics of a song. Or, your dream may be more of a treasure hunt.  Perhaps you see yourself walking along a path, picking up objects as clues to a new direction.

Your answer may be quite concrete and obvious or it may need some interpretation. Sometimes the answer to your question will be more subtle than you expect. For example, if I am stuck with writing copy for my website, I may get an image of tangled string or of something trapped in a maze.  Perhaps I’ve become tangled in my words or trapped myself by making the project too complex. 

The more open you are to the information you receive, whatever the format, the more useful it will be.

BE PREPARED FOR ANSWERS TO COME IN UNEXPECTED WAYS

While dreams and images are the most common ways to receive information from sleep writing questions, be prepared for answers to come at other times.  

There may be times when you don’t remember a dream at all.  Or, you may get no images at all upon awakening.  

However, thoughts or ideas may come to you in the shower, later in the day or while out on a walk.  It will seem as though the ideas came “out of the blue.” 

Keep experimenting and notice what happens.  Try both sleep writing before going to bed at night or prior to a catnap during the day.  

SLEEP WRITING HAS A CUMULATIVE EFFECT

Quite simply, the more often you ask questions and write down the answers you receive, the more information you will get.  If you use this technique on a regular basis you will find yourself getting increasingly better results. 

Over time, sleep writing will give you a new perspective on issues that have challenged you.  It will help you develop a sense of curiosity and wonder.  Keep track of your questions and the answers you receive over time.  You will be surprised at the profound impact sleep writing can have.

By the way, guess where I got the idea for this article?  Following a nap, of course!

Take good care,

 


If you find you could use some help integrating your writing and creative projects this fall, schedule a GRATIS SAMPLE COACHING SESSION via phone or in person to find out if writing & creativity coaching is for you. Phone (800) 552-WRITE, that's (800) 552-9748 or write to me at susan@susanborkin.com to find out more.

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Wednesday, September 10, 2014

I Have a Confession...

I have a confession to make, an embarrassing and quite disconcerting confession. If you read the description of the two upcoming events above, or have been following this newsletter for any length of time, you know how important journaling is in my life. But somewhere between completing my book, The Healing Power of Writing, course work and essays for the graduate program I’m enrolled in, my clients, and summer travel, I stopped journaling. 

HOW THIS HAPPENED

It’s not that I woke up one morning and thought, “That’s it, no more journaling for me!” It was nothing like that. It was more like, “I’ll get to it as soon as I finish my essay (or paper, or book chapter, or…).” It was like, “I’m doing so much other writing (or studying or reading) I can’t do any journaling.” And, it was like, “I just don’t have the energy to do any journaling.”

WHAT I NOTICED 

It was subtle, at first. I began to notice that something was wrong but it was nothing I could put my finger on. I noticed that I felt slightly out of sorts and easily annoyed. Then I noticed a feeling of restlessness; I couldn’t seem to settle down or get comfortable within myself. I began to notice that my afternoon power naps were becoming longer and longer. Finally, I was able to identify the culprit -- low level depression. 

WHAT HAPPENED NEXT

It occurred to me that in order to get out of this funk, I needed to do something, to create some kind of plan, or at least do something differently. One of the best ways of getting myself untangled and re-focused is, of all things…journaling. It wasn’t a question of whether or not I wanted to write; it was more an awareness that I needed to write. I simply could think of no better way to sort out my feelings and figure out what to do to feel better.

WHAT I LEARNED

I began journaling for a few minutes in the morning, easing my way back. The next day I wrote for ten minutes. I began to feel a little bit better. This felt familiar, comfortable, like putting on a well-worn bathrobe. By the third day of journaling, I could feel the tension easing in my neck and shoulders. By the fourth day, I knew what this month’s article would be about. I even remembered one of my all-time favorite quotes about writing: 
"I have forced myself to begin writing when I've been utterly exhausted, when I've felt my soul as thin as a playing card, when nothing has seemed worth enduring for another five minutes . . . and somehow the activity of writing changes everything."
     
 ---Joyce Carol Oates
Take good care,

 


If you find yourself with a case of the summertime blues, contact me for an informative discovery session via phone or in person. Phone (800) 552-WRITE, that's (800) 552-9748 or write to me at susan@susanborkin.com to find out more.

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Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Ain't No Cure For the Summertime Blues

You might remember a song called “Summertime Blues,” written and recorded by Eddie Cochran and later recorded by Alan Jackson. The lyrics tell the story of a teenager bemoaning his plight---having to work at a summer job.  The catchy refrain is of course; “Ain’t no cure for the summertime blues.”

I don’t know about you, but I’ve been feeling a bit of the summertime blues the last few days as I realize how quickly the summer seems to have flown by! 

I invite you to join me and shake off the summertime blues. Get creative with these last few weeks of summer before school starts and fall programs begin. 

Grab your journal to make notes and find a quiet, private spot.  Then try these three ways to savor what remains of these precious summer days.

SAVOR THE MEMORY


When you’ve settled in, close your eyes and take several deep breaths.  Let your breathing slow and deepen.  Now, remember three absolutely favorite moments of the summer so far. 

One of mine was watching my grandsons play with a Lego set with intense concentration and total involvement in their task.  What do you remember?  A walk on the beach as a cold wave lapped at your ankles?  Cotton candy at a state fair tasting just as good as you remembered it from childhood?  Pause, remember and make some notes.

SAVOR THE PRESENT


Today, right now, stop whatever you are doing (even reading this article!)  What are you aware of?  What do you notice as you look around?  What do you see that brings you pleasure?

I’m sitting in my office as I write this, a Steven Halpern CD, in the background.  I stop for a moment and let the music wash over me; hearing each individual instrument and the harmony as the sounds meld.  I smile as I look more closely at a portrait on a wall calendar, seeing details in the picture I never noticed before.  Stay present with your experience.  Then, make some notes.

SAVOR THE FUTURE

As you settle, become more relaxed and take a couple of deep breaths, use your imagination and think of something coming up in the near future.  Are you going camping in the woods next weekend?  Are you anticipating an exceptionally  mouth-watering meal?

As I close my eyes, I think about getting back to a laugh out loud book I have been reading.  I think of the farmer’s market I’ll shop at in a few days and the taste of ripe strawberries.  Write down what you anticipate and increase the depth of your savoring.

You get the idea.  So, is there a cure for the summertime blues?  Try savoring your experiences - before, after and during.  It’s practically guaranteed to cure the summertime blues!

Take good care,

 



If you find yourself with a case of the summertime blues, contact me for an informative discovery session via phone or in person. Phone (800) 552-WRITE, that's (800) 552-9748 or write to me at susan@susanborkin.com to find out more.

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Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Vacation Perspective

Even if you don’t actually have a summer vacation planned, it’s still possible to make use of the vacation perspective.  What I mean by that is to use taking a vacation, a weekend away or even an afternoon hike to gain perspective on your life, goals, plans and daily activities.

Try this.  If you’ve recently returned from a vacation or are planning one in the near future or have a get away weekend or daytime outing planned, consider being on the lookout for a new perspective on your return.
First, plan ahead.  Be open to seeing your life, home, work, relationships, or daily activities from a new point of view.

Here are some examples:
  • Am I enjoying the physical space I’m living in?
  • Am I keeping the schedule I want to be keeping?
  • What do I want to be doing more of?
  • What do I want to be doing less of?
  • What’s missing for me in my home or office?
  • Am I spending time with the people I want to be spending time with?
  • Am I doing work I love and is it satisfying to me?
  • What changes do I need to be making in other areas of my life?
Second, be prepared to take notes very soon after returning from your vacation, weekend away or daylong outing.  Write down the first reactions of what you see or think about.

Here are some ideas:

  • How long have those piles of clothes, books and papers been sitting in the corner?
  • I just looked at my calendar for the week and notice there is no down time for me!
  • I loved reading 4 books at the beach.  How can I schedule more time to read?
  • I notice I’m avoiding returning certain phone calls.  What’s going on here?
  • I’m feeling really refreshed and energized from my trip.  What can I do to retain that feeling?
  • Am I getting enough rest?  Maybe I need change the time I go to bed or get up in the morning. 
  • Maybe it’s time to consider a job that makes me happier.
Third, set aside some time to do some thoughtful analysis. This is important to do.  The “newness” of your vacation perspective will disappear quickly.

Here are some sample remarks:
  • I can’t afford to paint right now, but a new plant might spruce up the living room.  There are probably other small things I can do to fix up my apartment.
  • I need to schedule in more recreational and downtime during the week.
  • I need to set better boundaries between work and play.
  • There are people I want to be connecting with and I’ve gotten out-of touch.  I want to begin to re-connect. 
  • I think I’ve been avoiding some calls because I hate telling people “No.”
Fourth, schedule time to make the changes you’ve become aware of in this process. Break down each change into specific tasks and schedule time to do them.

Here are several ways to organize your follow-up tasks:
  • Use your planner, to block out specific time to do tasks.  Even if you need to adjust the time later, at least you’re now more conscious of what needs to be done. Tasks are more likely to be completed when written down.
  • Create mind maps for projects.  It’s a great way to make sure you’re not skipping any steps.
  • Use open-ended lists to add new ideas and tasks as they come to you.
  • Create a simple collage or find a picture representing completion of your tasks and projects to keep yourself focused and motivated.
Enjoy your summer vacation plans.  Remember to get even more from your time away by using “vacation perspective” when you return.

Take good care,

 



If you find yourself wanting some support on gaining perspective on your life, contact me for an informative discovery session via phone or in person. Phone (800) 552-WRITE, that's (800) 552-9748 or write to me at susan@susanborkin.com to find out more.

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